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blinking stoplight and no movie theaters. so religion was what people did. everyone went to church, and my father was far more conservative than the average person in the town. we were not permitted to wear pants, shorts, no alcohol, no dancing, no musical instruments in our church of christ. in lots of ways i was quiet at home in saudi arabia. [laughter] i devoted my time to trying to figure this country out precisely because i think it is the one arab country that is truly strategic. not only because it is the world's largest exporter of oil, which sustains the western way of life, but because saudi arabia, i am convinced, will be critical in the ultimate resolution of what is the proper islam which is going on now between the radicals, jihadists if you will, and the more modernizing muslims. and that very battle also goes on inside saudi arabia. to try to understand this society, i knew you would like someone coming to to write a book about america, you wouldn't be able to go to washington and new york and claim to understand america. so i had to be confident that i could get outside of
is if they are going to be a sustained relationship, the teaching of the jewish religion has an institution for na, and that is marriage. because jesus as a result of the pressures on him was constantly traveling, he could not uphold the jewish law at that time which held you had to provide a woman with a household near her original family. you couldn't, for example, take a woman from galilee to judea or judea to galilee. from the town to the country side or vice versa. that is one reason for caution. >> give me the second one. 13 years old was the average age according to the jewish religion a woman becomes betrothed and that young lady was watched carefully by her parents and others to see to it that she arrived at the marriage state in a state of virgin, correct? that line was crossed. isn't that all very small academic minor green eye shade material when you are faced with the reality of this situation? >> it may be. the other factor i had in mind is mary mag ga -- magdalene's previous possession. we don't know the nature of that earlier difficulty. >> we are talking about the demons. >> exact
party is willing to say we'll bring religion -- organized prayer back to public school. we'll outlaw abortion. we won't go along with this new trend towards gay rights. we're with you in the church. how do you tell those people the reason you joined the republican party they don't want to push too hard anymore, in fact, they want to sort of closet it? >> you can't really tell them that so they are not exactly saying that. you've got a spectacle where reince priebus is saying, yes, we want gay people to vote for us but we won't change your policies. we won't give them equal rights. we've seen him backtrack now on gay marriage and, you know, we want african-americans to vote for us but we're going to suppress their votes in lots of states. so it's totally contradictory. they recognize they have a branding problem and messaging problem and, chris, the voters you're talking about have gotten old and some of them have passed away and left us. and the issue -- >> joan, you have just -- you have just basically said that your party is dying. >> well, first of all -- >> it is dying. >> you pr
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
that two weeks ago true religion, the jeans company announced it wouldn't be renewing its contract with its founder and now former ceo who stepped down this tuesday. today we found out from the "new york post" those firms true religion is trying to sell itself to might be getting out of the bidding. an unexpected leadership change is rarely a sign good things are happening. of course, not all unexpected ceo departures are negative. when a bad ceo gets the boot, see you later, that's always a good thing. hence why we have the "mad money" wall of shame to call out these incompetents. sometimes the boards need to see them on the wall of shame to get motivated. everybody already understands that things are going poorly. for example, the dog that is groupon roared after it announced its foolish founder and ceo andrew mason was being axed at the end of february. same thing happened to avon when wall of shamer andrea young was forced to resign as ceo last april and had to step down as chairman in october. what about when a good ceo leaves, or a great one? we never like losing a talented manager. i
muslims accept, but not all. i respect my religion's teaching and what it orders me to do says officer maher, energized by the revolution some police officers started sporting beards. the interior ministry suspended them. the bearded band of police hit back with lawsuits and protests. we won't leave, says this captain. we want egypt to be based on the values of the revolution, to not ban people based on gender or religion. egypt's battle over beards highlights the intense conflict that came after the revolution between islamists and secularists. fueling the conflict? deep-seeded mistrust on both sides. >> you wouldn't trust it? >> no. >> came world famous blogging about human rights in egypt. convinced bearded officers are on a mission to islamtize the police force. >> i will not be comfortable if the cop who stops me and asks me for my car license is a bearded guy. i will never be comfortable. >> egypt's bearded officers insist all they want is to serve on a secular force while honoring islam. this dilemma is one of many challenges for a young revolution struggling to create a democra
, freedom from religion, is protesting the memorial and several others, not because of the memorial itself, but they say because there's a cross on the memorial and that, they say, violates the separation of church and state and saying, i'm quoting here, our objection is to the message of endorsement of christianity over other religions and over non-religions. the christian-only memorial sends a message that the government only cares about the deaths of christian soldiers, not jewish, other non-christian and non-religious soldiers. coos bay says this. >> we passed it on to our city attorney to review that and relevant case law. and obviously these cases are happening around the nation. >> trace: again, it becomes a legal fight and the legal fights have been kind of split decisions. remember the cross of mount soledad? that had to be taken down. the mojave memorial was donated to a veterans group, but the supreme court ruled that that did not violate the establishment clause and they allowed that cross to stay. so somebody stole it a couple of years ago, so now it's gone. but legally, it wa
. great to see you. >> still to come, god and the gop. is turning away from a focus on religion the only answer of the gop to survive? plus, president obama's trip to israel hits a speed bump. the real reason his limo needed a tow today is next. >>> and there's a growing trend of super skyscrapers, i don't think is a better word to describe some of these guys, being built around the world. who's is biggest? bny mellon has the vision and experience to help. we look at the full picture... to uncover risk, find opportunities, and create a plan that's best suited for you. bny mellon. both of us actually. our pharmacist recommended it. and that makes me feel pretty good about it. and then i heard about a study looking at multivitamins and the long term health benefits. and what do you know? they used centrum silver in the study. makes me feel even better, that's what i take. sorry, we take. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. a hairline fracture to the mandible and contusions to the metacarpus. what do you see? um
the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >> what i said, i think we're going to win. i don't think we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. and i don't think there is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> what is your take on that with prop 8? will it divide the court as some other issues? >> i think it will be divisive. i can't call exactly what the numbers breakdown will be but it is important to note that in the california situation, what you've got is a state that first gave rights to same sex marriage. to gays. and then yanked it away in this proposition 8. and i think that makes it a different case than whether there is a right to same sex marriage nationally and in all the states. here, it looks very much like something that was given was then taken away and maybe because they just don't like gay people. that is the argument. so in that situation, i think we have a very special case. and there is
in another world. you can see the pope service there, too. great place to be no matter what your religion. >> all of the art alone. you are not taking a picture with a flash but i snap add couple when i was there. you are in paris right now. what about the note dam cathedral? >> i was in note dam yesterday here in paris. it is another one sitting around for 850 years absolutely beautiful place. you walk in you just feel a part of history. from the hunchback of notre dame to modern day. pope francis will be there in a couple days i believe. it's really awesome and right in the middle of paris. >> sounds a little windy there in paris today but i don't feel too bad for you. florence, italy. i was licky enough to be there as well. why should revisit there? >> i am sorry it was a little windy. >> florence italy the cathedral we should visit. >> it is the center of the city. it's the center piece of laurens. you can find it anywhere. it is beautiful tops wonderful place. florence is a great place in general. >> amazing architecture there. >> st. pauls cathedral in london, england that made the
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
? >> right. just for all purposes of full disclosure here, i think that -- i believe in religion and i'm not an atheist by any means. but this has been very clear and determined by the courts that this is a violation of the establishment clause of the constitution or the first amendment. and why that is is because you can not have an entanglement of public and religion here. that's what's going on. this is a public school and this is the school putting a seal of approval on a religious piece of art. >> ainsley: okay. david, we want to hear the other side of this because any time we see a nativity, a portrait of jesus, the ten commands, we know it's a matter of time before the aclu will get involved. do they have a case here? >> certainly they may have a case burks i don't think they're going to be victorious. it's not as easy it was just explained. this is a convoluted type of thing. this particular situation is sponsored by a private club within a public school. the supreme court has been very clear -- >> which case? you're absolutely wrong. there has been no case. >> i'm in the middl
reminiscing and thinking about the role of religion. it is an important piece for her. >> asked up his neck. >> first of all -- next up is nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great row graham. i am glad you are part of -- program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our , we have an centers plaque. an a book where you get impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection with maryland. she wa
and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland. hi, nick. >> hi, how are you? first of all, thank you, c-span, for this great program. mr. smith, i'm very excited to get through. i think your work is great and i'm glad you're part of this series as well. two things i hope to get you to comment on. i live in calvert county. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors if not the first governor. there is not a sources linking her here. in the town center, there is a placard talking about her he had readty to the area. and there is an impression of louisa catherine that she is very much involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it's just on the surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises made during this time. would both of you mind commenting on those two things? >> the johnsons we wish to explain are louisa catherine's birth family. connections in calvert county, maryland, do you know of them? >> yes, her f
on race or gender or sexual orientation or religion or national origin. but it can say for example we will operate this company more efficiently and give the shareholders a greater return on equity if we hire people within this range off, fill in the blanks, for blood pressure and weight because we are now forced to provide you with out care, this is i a more efficient class of people for whom to provide health care. can they do that, yes. dagen: don't you think they are asking for the ire of people around the country and accusations of discrimination in some way? >> not all discrimination is prohibited by law. the only discrimination is the basis by which we talked about. and we know those, gender, race, age, religion, etc. but on the base of health is not prohibited by law. with this exception. the americans for disability act prohibits discriminating against someone because they have an articulable disability. a physical disability, emotional or mental disability. high blood pressure or heavyweight is not immeasurable disability. connell: not taking care of yourself is not a disabi
? >> i don't know. old saying in the south it doesn't matter how you find religion as long as you do. i don't know if it is the dropping poll numbers or wants a leg icy and realizes you you can't have one without talking to republicans. either way it is a constructive thing. >> mike: i said you can't govern if you don't have relationships. >> right. >> mike: you can't have relationships if you don't look at each other face to face and spend time together. may not always be pleasant but it has got to be done. are you convinced and you were one of the senators that had dinner with him on the thursday night at the jefferson hotel. is he being a workhorse? or a showhorse? >> that is the ultimate the question. time will tell. he asked me to put the dinner on so i did. i picked some republicans that i thought would be interested in talking to the president. i know there are many more that would have been interested. we had a kind of limited number so i picked people i thought the president would like talking to. it was a great dinner. if he is going to be a workhorse that means he and his adm
celebrated the end of winter and now lint. religions, agan they consumed vast quantities of pancakes. more russians are embracing christianity. we get a report now. >> it's a time of prayer for russia's orthodox faithful. a preparation for lint, a holy eriod of abstinence. there are many churches shuttered. now the towns are pilgrimages for russia's increasingly spiritual society. >> newcomers found their place n life through the church. >> and it is also famous for its festival, a chance for everyone to feast, while others fast. >> the most important thing is, of course, is the spiritual development rather than simply dieting. people should go to church, rad read the bible, think about their sins, their soles -- souls and confess and with a clean soul you can break your fast. >> age old traditions attract the croused. some had come to watch. others to take part. >> we are very happy to be here. it's our all slavic land. we're going to different churches here and we wanted to be together for lint. together there is ritual strength. >> the festival calls for joy and laughter before the seri
extremism. city leaders say it is unfair to characterize an entire religion as violent. where was the city when the propalestinian group ran its own hateful ads. >> i think the san francisco official reaction to our ads is obscene and absurd. they wouldn't condemn the hateful statements on the air even when specifically asked to do so. they are only condemning me for drawing attention to those statements as if this problem will go away if we ignore it. >> because of previous first amendment court rulings they must roll the ad. >>> an early morning blaze is still under investigation tonight. this stubborn fire took hours to contain. the flames destroyed two homes. falling power lines made it hard for firefighters to bring the fire under control. >>> from berlin to mountain view a piece of world history is about to get a bigger platform. two large pieces of the berlin wall will soon be in front of the library. they are currently at an office park. there are portions of the wall on display in other parts of the country but this is the only one in the bay area. no word on when the slabs will b
unchained, liberated and they are trying to diminish any form of religion. the goal is to marginalize religious opposition to secular programs. for example, in canada, in china, a woman can have an abortion for any reason at any time. secular progressives want that here. but traditional forces in america are in opposition. therefore, in this country, you can't terminate a baby without to be born without a damn good reason. if you do abort a latham late term baby you can be charged with murder. sp's hate that in scandinavia there are laws that say you cannot criticize minorities and if you do, you could be arrested. secular progressives want laws like that here. also, of the legalization of drugs well underway in many places. and that is the secular cause. so, if the far left can marginalize santa and the easter bunny. if they can tell the children those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary, they then set the stage for a totally secular society in the future. and that's what you have in scandinavia. and that's why the easter bunny is on the run here in america. and that's the memo. now
to diminish any form of religion. the goal is to marginalize religious opposition to secular programs. >> well, o'reilly went on to say that they can tell children that those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary then that sets the stage for a totally secular society in the future. what the heck is a spring egg anyway? >> i don't know. you call the spring bunny little candy bunny the spring bunny and peeps. >> easter. >> anyway. okay. although easter is right around the corner. it sure doesn't feel like it. that is landing america's favorite groundhog in some hot water this morning. punxsutawney phil may be heading to court for predicting an early spring. it's true. phil the groundhog has been indicted in ohio for the misrepresentation of early spring. an ohio prosecutor says that phil was calculating and predicting spring despite snow and record cold temperatures that followed. >> i think need more to do that? >> okay. well, let's get your first degree weather update with maria molina. >> good morning. eye have a question are they going to start indicting meteorologists. >> you are are a law-a
yeo economic levels within all religions and every level of education. according to the government. the united states has the worst record in industrialized nation losing five children every day to abuse death. joining me in the studio from the san francisco child abuse prevention center is katie allbright. >> thank you so much for having me around for shining the spotlight on this important issue. >>er love what the prevention does. you are celebrating an anniversary today? >> yes, we have been working in san francisco for 40 years preventing child abuse. we are very excited about our future and vision. we're here to stay and looking forward to the next 40 years. >> cheryl: this was started by a man with immense compassion for the issue? >> he was a pediatrician at general hospital and saw incidents of violence in the hospital, how in the community can come together to protect children. that inspired a man and we were able to do it for 40 years here in san francisco. >> cheryl: you have a number of
of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, judaism, christianity. it's a story that's inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. to african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [ applause ] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world.
't matter how you find religion, as long as you do. i don't know if it's the drop in poll numbers or wants a legacy arealizes you can't have one without talking to republicans. either way it's a constructive thing. >> you can't govern if you don't have relationships and can't have relationships if you don't look at each other face-to-face and spend time together. may not always be pleasant, but it's got to be done and are you convinced-- you're one of the senators that had dinner with him thursday night at the hotel, is he being a work horse or a show horse? >> that's the ultimate question. time will tell. he asked me to put the dinner on, so, i did, i picked some republicans thought would be interested talking to the president. i know many more would have been interested. we're kind of limited number so i picked republicans i thought the president would enjoy talking to. if he's going to be a work horse he and his administration have to get in the room with the republicans to find a way to solve our budget problem. you can't do this campaigning, and i think he realizes being campaigner in
. there are wonderful activities going on by all of the world's major religions right now including the evangelical churches to say this is a moral and religious issue, okay. from our worldview, from our standpoint, this is crucial both because we were commanded by god in genesis to till and tend the garden, to care for his creation which when he created he kept telling us, "it is good." okay, it is our responsibility they would say to take care of his creation, and that the kinds of things that we are currently doing to the planet are essentially violating that promise. but moreover, we're also seeing the theme of social justice, that we've been commanded, they would say, to take care of the least of these -- the poor, the sick, the powerless both in our own country and around the world. and many churches, in fact, have invested enormous resources, i mean, sending their young people abroad to do great works to try to help people who desperately need that help. their argument would be how can we in good conscience ignore a problem that's just going to push millions of more people around the world i
he said. "the vast majority of the world's 1.4 billion muslims adhere to a view of their religion that agrees on the need to impose sharia or islamic law on the world." he goes on to say that both the obama and even bush administration were too soft on islamists. does it disturb you that that comes from the mouth of once the top enforcement officer of this nation? >> well, yes, and it speaks to, you know, sort of the problem we're saying this report does not really get into policy. there's a reason they don't get into policy. if you get into policy, this is the sort of thing you have to say. >> how can he possibly make a claim like this about such a vast number of people? >> the entire tone from the right since 9/11 toward islam, toward muslims has been on par with this, roughly speaking. that's because it's sort of -- there was an appetite for that among the conservative base. and there's so much pressure in the party right now. it's a dysfunctional party in so many ways because there is so much pressure to conform to, you know, where the base is on a question like this. and if y
've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there getting religion and i've sort of lost sight what's going on in washington. give me an update of what i have missed. >> there's no white smoke coming out of the rnc building yet charlie i will tell you that. >> rose: what about the whitehouse. >> or the whitehouse. there's a great deal of ferment going on in the republican party right now which i think by and rge is healthy. there's a cole caveats now but the previous report on immigration i think a lot of things are happening. rand paul today came out for at least legal status for immigrants. so i think some people thought after this last election debalk backal will be pointing fingers and there's a lot of that going on. some of this stuff i think is productive for them now. putting a paper together the way actually doing some of this stuff. for instance it says we can't be a party of universal purity. yes we can all agree on that. it may be harder when they get to the caucuses. >> rose: are you watching or seeing each of the possible canned dates in 2016 stakin
this debate and they talk about religion and the debate of same sex marriage, a lot of people the knee-jerk reaction is the bible condemns this, the bible condemns this. what do you say to that? >> well, certainly if you look for the witness scripture you're not going to find anything about gay marriage. you're going to see scattered passages about homosexuality but because it's on long-term monogamous between same sex couples, that silence we need to understand it. the bible says as much about gay marriage as it does about the internet. and we are living in a different time. and our church as a witness to couples that are very powerfully in love with each other and are witnessing in their faith. one of the things we say in the wedding ceremony in the united methodist liturgy is the couple creates a new ministry for the church. well, our congregation has been blessed by the witness of gay and lesbian couples who have been in those long-term relationships who have a deep commitment that it's about love, it's not about other things that people want to raise up around issues with scriptur
of religion or faith and that causes the tradition and women to the to be limited or the girl or a child not to be sent to school and therefore we issued a strong statement of the elders about three years ago now saying that the leaders should champion the quality of girls and women that should be part of their spirituality and their faith and most of them are men. [applause] and then we said that's all very well but what are we going to do practically? and that brought us to the early child marriage issue and because marriage isn't a private thing it is sanctioned in some religious way and therefore it was a good example. i was aware of the expense of this in certain countries but by and large we underestimated and the archbishop is honest about saying that he totally underestimated the numbers that we are talking about. 10 million girls a year. that is 100 million girls in a decade or married without their consent, and very often without their knowledge on today itself way before they are ready for it physically or emotionally. we went to ethiopia where blah, -- the blah is and they we
or break the electorate down by religion. for example, white evangelicals form a strong part of the republican party base. they are overwhelmingly opposed. but everybody else who is not a white evangelical christian by 20-plus points support freedom to marry. >> i want to go through some of these numbers that show the shift. some of them are in places we might think independents. but a lot of them are not. so, look, this is abc "washington post" polling. '04, 15% of republicans support gay marriage. now 33%, more than double, i'm not a math major but i think that's right. conservatives, 10% in '04 -- three times as much. and minorities, 28 -- this is remarkable and i think honestly, barack obama deserves a significant amount of credit for being an african-american president of the united states, supporting same-sex marriage. 28% in 2004. 61% now. alex, these changes, they're not just -- it's not democrats getting more in favor of it. here's the fundamental question. what does your party do? this is what we have been talking about. you have some people saying -- john huntsman,
republican, religion comes from church, basic moral beliefs. according in this poll, they're the same people. better than that, the business conservatives buy into the cultural issues. cultural driven people buy into the business issues. it's heterogeneous. >> it's heterogeneous internally but they turned inward. a generation ago the republican party reached outward and reached to people who had been democrats. they expanded demographically because they got a lot of catholics, got northern catholics in the party who hadn't been there before and got southerners who had been democrats and who were economically diverse. there were a lot of working class and middle class democrats who came over to the republican party. so they were expanding a generation ago by reaching out. what's happened now, because of ideology, because of the focus on ideology, these two groups look for ideological overlaps and that's all they talk about. that's all they talk about. in common areas they can agree, whether it's abortion or guns or r lower taxes. they're talking to each other, not to the whole country. >> thi
time. i'm not accusing everybody who's against gay marriage as bigotry. it's true that some religions treat that, which may or may not be bigotry. >> this case is the fact that the equal protection clause will create a new class. >> that's the state of this country, and individuals have a right to be treated the same way as everybody else. and that is at the core of this debate. >> a tricky question. but it violates the equal protection clause. you have to create a new class of people. >> do we need more individual rights, or is this a question about marriage? those are two different -- they may be related, but they're two different things. >> that's a very important question. the question before the supreme court, regardless of who's changing their mind on it or whose loved one is gay. who among us doesn't have a loved one who's gay. that's a given. the question is whether the 14th amendment clause should create a new class of people? the supreme court hasn't done that in 30 years. >> it's about whether the equal protection clause protects people who have the right to marry. >> that'
, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection w
contextually means taking care of children. but this -- this is a sign, their religion is so often about signs and sim bog that he was able to have his inaugural mass on this day, that we have a ten-year anniversary of the iraq war coming out, that we have the anniversary of the march from selma to montgomery coming out, that these are opportunities that his leadership has begun during for him to weigh in and hear what his message is as it extends to the world. >> and let's recall during that homily the protection of creation that he talked about. this is one who took francis as his name, francis being a great creationist, praying brother, son, sister moon, and so this pope, i think, you will see a reach out, an outreach to ecology and protecting of the environment, much like benedict. >> looking at all the flags waving a moment ago in st. peter's square there. it is quite a scene. the vatican says 200,000 people, 150,000 to 200,000 people there. maybe a little bit on the lower end if you're doing crowd estimates right there. but jim bittermann is there and whatever the number is, there was ce
with religion and so that's where we have the fundamental disagreement. >> which may be part of the problem. i think everybody should be able to be married civilly perhaps, but only some then have a religious ceremony. >> we'll take that. that's all we want. >> religious has a connotation. that's the distinction. >> if the catholic church says they support full civil rights, equal rights for same-sex partners, but they don't want it called marriage in the church, we'd take it. that would be fantastic. >> does it seem like that is exactly what he was doing? >> he hasn't said that publicly. perhaps said it privately. >> in the bishops conference meeting, he said it. >> it's a different prism that they are doing everything through. the prism through the archbishop of buenos aires is different than pope. >> and smaller group of people than the 1.2 billion throughout the world. >> i think we ultimately believe in separation of church and state and equal rights. i don't want a religious leader denying rights to people. >> i don't want to suggest that somehow i'm negative on it. if the new pope is wi
of the three great religions, judaism, christianity, and islam that trace their origins to abraham and see jerusalem as sacred. and it's a story that's inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. to african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom, expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth, we must bear our respo
or religion or cult the arrogance of their superiority reminds us that they do not give us right. we grant them power. they do not make us free. we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. the nra ad -- philip rucker, how effective is the nra message right now? guest: a message like that is effective with the base of the nra and many americans that live in some of these dates -- it's dates -- states. you play and add like that in ,est virginia, north carolina north dakota, and it resonates. it is a message about the elite in washington and san francisco, which is a reference to nancy pelosi, the democratic leaders in the house, and it is really trying to create these cultural divisions between decision- makers in washington and people back home who have guns and use them for sport. host: "political" tells us that nra fundraising is that the best in a decade. guest: the nra also reports that membership is growing, something the nra has been effective and skilled
christ-- not a religion, not a denomination, not a philosophy, but a person. and this book that he wrote, he only wrote one-- i have to do nine and keep at it until i get it right-- but has been embraced by millions through the ages and people of different racial, ethnic, genders, philosophies, and political parties. he is the only person who ever claimed to be god, and to prove it by rising from the dead and to have changed the lives of billions of people throughout the history of the world. it is a book that is self- authenticating. you read it, you understand it to be true. most people, though, haven't read it. they think "god helps those who help themselves" is in the bible, and "separation of church and state" is in the constitution. neither is true. >> let me ask you again, though, how sure are you that this is absolute? i mean, they're words on paper. >> i'm so sure, i'd stake my life on it. you can't make a better investment than that. >> you've got a quote in here about liberals, and i can't-- i'll find it here in just a second. i know-- maybe you can remember how you define lib
accomplished in india. we studied the role of disobedience and we studied the great religions of the world. and when it was time for the young people to sit in, we did. many of us use nonviolence not simply as a technique or but it as a way of life in the way of living. we wanted as dr. king was there the soul of america to create a beloved community. you heard in the introduction i did get arrested a few times. 40 times. during the 60s but since i've been in congress i got arrested four more times around the issues of south africa and around what was going on in sudan. but we never gave up during those days. we never gave in. them. we never gave out in spite of being beaten, left bloody and unconscious, having a concussion on that ridge. i still believe in the power of love. i still believe that somehow and some way we can overcome. we can create one community, one family, one house if we all live in the same house. not just an american house but the world house. it doesn't matter we are there we are lack, white latino asian-america or native american we must stay with our house and hold
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